Diabetic Foot Ulcer Treatment


Diabetic foot ulcer treatment is best treated by a podiatrist and foot specialist 95%. Don’t put your leg at risk, get your leg healed immediately and seeing a podiatrist as fast as you can!


Your wound should heal at least 50% per month, if not – then you need to see a podiatrist or foot specialist immediately!

What is a diabetic foot ulcer?

A diabetic foot ulcer is a sore on the bottom of your foot that occurs at some point in almost 25% of all diabetic patients throughout their life. The most common site for a diabetic ulcer is on your foot. A large portion of these people become hospitalized due to an infection or an ulcer or related complication.

Diabetes and blood flow disease has been called the number one cause of foot or leg amputation in the United States. Some patients who develop a full ulcer, if untreated can progress to amputation. In those diabetics who do receive in amputation, these are almost always preceded by a diabetic foot ulceration. Research has shown that working with a podiatrist is one of the single best things you can do to prevent your foot also.

Diabetic Foot sores
Diabetic foot sores can definitely lead to a diabetic foot infection.

Causes of a Diabetic Foot Ulcer:

if you have diabetes, there is a strong chance that sometimes through your life you can develop a foot ulcer if you do not take the right precautions.

Studies do show that certain populations and backgrounds are more likely to develop an ulcer, this includes Native Americans, Hispanic, and African-American populations. The single most common demographic is older men.

Patients who are advanced diabetics, who need to use insulin are at the highest risk of developing a full ulcer. This is especially true if you have diabetes related issues such as kidney, eye, and heart disease issues.

A diabetic foot ulcer is also strongly correlated to both being overweight and using alcohol.

The two biggest associated health conditions to being a diabetic are smoking, and the use of alcohol.

How to make a wound heal faster
Diabetic foot infections are almost always started by diabetic foot ulcers

Diabetic Foot Care Prevention

Most Diabetic foot ulcers are formed due to a combination of numerous factors: the most common of these are the lack of feeling in your foot, poor blood flow down to your foot, foot deformities, constant rubbing or pressure, as well as how long if it had diabetes. Most diabetic patients with foot ulcers first begin to lose sensation in their foot, this is a condition called peripheral neuropathy. This is then combined with rising blood sugar level that can sometimes be well over 200. The tricky thing about diabetes is that you do not feel the wound coming on, so the patient is usually not aware of the formation of the diabetic foot ulcer. This is the perfect time to see your podiatrist as a week and check for the lack of sensation and show you strategies to be aware of this.

The second thing that can be done is the valuation of your foot care, you must make sure that you are wearing the right things every day. Things as simple as the stitching in your sock, or the stitching on the inside of your shoe can easily cause a diabetic foot ulcer to develop.

How to make a wound heal faster?

Study showed that seeing a foot in wound specialist such as a podiatrist is one of the single most effective things you can do. Don’t worry organ give you more information than just that!

The single best thing you can do is to evaluate and make sure that you are doing nothing wrong, for example what I mean by this is that some people are usually missing one very important criteria that is necessary to healing. This means looking out for the basics. The four basics are, evaluating your blood flow to make sure you have excellent blood flow, making sure your blood sugar is low and under control, making sure that you are not putting any pressure on to your foot and finally make sure that you don’t have an infection.

The single biggest mistake to treating foot ulcer, is relying on products. Biggest waste of time is focusing only on expensive products such as stem cells or expensive creams. Sure they are helpful in a comprehensive treatment plan, but we see tons of people doing everything wrong, but then trying to apply an expensive cream and hoping for magical results. The true way to heal a diabetic foot ulcer is to make sure you have the four basics in place. If you are able to do these four things well, you are almost guaranteed to heal your wound, but easier said than done! Don’t fall into the commercialized trap of trying to buy better and more expensive products and not doing the basics that are cheap easy and proven to be affected by hard science.

How to treat a diabetic foot ulcer:

The four basics:

Great blood flow:

Go see your podiatrist get your blood flow evaluating, this is called your arterial brachial index, this is an easy screening test that can be performed and is usually the first test order. Your podiatrist will check your blood flow to your dorsalis pedis and your posterior tibialis arteries. If your blood flow is reasonable, then this is the single biggest criterion here in your foot ulcer. If you have some type of blockage, if you are a smoker, if your long-term diabetic, your podiatrist will work with a vascular surgeon to optimize your blood flow. This is crucial and essential step. In our opinion this is the single biggest thing that can be done for most patients with chronic nonhealing ulcers.

Get your diabetes under control:

This is another area where your podiatrist and primary care doctor can work together in terms of optimizing your healing rate. If your blood sugar is anything over 120 on average, this will severely compromise your healing ability. Many times we have patients with ulcers, and saying all my blood sugar is normal at 200, this is not normal!

It is 100% necessary to get your blood sugar as normal as possible to have any chance of healing your ulcer. Don’t fall for the gimmicks, care products will not work if you do not have blood flow and your blood sugar is averaging over 120. These are the single biggest and easiest things you can do to correct the underlying reasons for why you are having an ulcer.

Make sure you don’t have an infection:

This is an area where your podiatrist can work with an infectious disease doctor. If you have any redness around your wound, or if there is any drainage from the center of your wound, it is very likely that you have an infection the current. In the short term it is essential to start taking antibiotics, and to get antibiotic medication onto this site. This can be life-threatening if allowed to continue for lengthy periods of time without improving.

If you have redness or drainage developing around your ulcer, don’t waste any time, this is the single most urgent thing you can do, don’t be someone who loses their leg because they waited one or two days too long.

Take pressure off the diabetic foot ulcer:

Once you meet the first three criteria for wound healing, this is where podiatrists will really get you to close up your wound as quick as possible. If you have great blood flow, if your diabetes are well-controlled, and if you don’t have an infection, the next best thing to do is to take pressure off the wound site.

Once you meet all four of these criteria, the wound rapidly can close for you. That may sound simple when I write it like this, but harder said than done! Most people with foot ulcers have had a hard time staying off of it, and are not in the world best physical condition. For example you can’t just hop around 1 foot for a month or two until the wound heals, and it’s usually not an option to just lay in bed for a month or two.

This is where special equipment like offloading orthotics, good shoe gear, ankle foot braces, diabetic shoes and diabetic inserts, once you’re able to offload the level, most of our patients have pretty rapid healing. In our clinic patients a day with rooms on their feet, and if we get their feet offloaded and meet the four criteria I outlined, almost every single patient reaches rapid.

About the author

The Modern Podiatrist (Foot and Ankle Specialist Doctor):Today's podiatrist is required to undergo rigorous medical training that licenses them as physicians with equivalent legal standing to the MD and DO degree (These are physician recognized licenses most common only in the USA). Although admittedly the training does differ between the three degrees. The differences are listed below.In Michigan Podiatrists are trained and authorized to perform surgery in the foot and ankle up to the tibial tubercle below the knee.All our podiatrists and foot doctors have undergone rigorous training including a 4 undergraduate college degree, writing the medical school entrance exam (MCAT), followed by a 4 year medical school degree (DPM - Doctor of Podiatric Medicine),Once podiatrists in the USA complete the rigorous 4 year medical school courses, they are required to complete a minimum of 3 years of a surgical and non-surgical residency program. Some podiatrists and foot doctors then choose to go on to further fellowship training specializing in various forms of specialty such as diabetic surgery or reconstructive foot and ankle surgery.The training is not over yet! Each podiatrist must be judged by a governing body where they submit their surgical cases and are reviewed regularly to ensure excellent results. This is a career long evaluation with board qualifications and certifications every few years.So have faith that today's podiatrist is your best choice for your foot and ankle problems! We are able to approach you foot and ankle problems from a non-surgery perspective, but that when necessary we can provide you with the treatment that you need!All articles written by this account are considered to be for educational purposes only. It is impossible for us to truly assess your condition and the advice we give here is meant to give you a basis to then follow up with your podiatrist and foot doctor later.If you have any questions at all, or there is anything that we can help you with, please feel free to contact our office or email us. Podiatrists provide medically necessary treatment which should be covered by valid insurance plans, we are not a cosmetic or elective medical specialty.