Hard Bump on the Bottom of my Foot

Hard Bump On The Bottom Of My Foot

The hard bump on the bottom of my foot is usually due to 4 common causes:

 

1) Plantar Fibroma:

  • A fibroma is a concentration of connective tissue.
  • This usually starts to trauma, but can occur for any reason.
  • This can feel like a hard pebble just under your skin.
  • If can range from 2mm to 5 cm!
  • It could be one bump or multiple bumps.
  • They are usually non-painful, but as you walk on them they start to hurt!

 

Hard Bump on the Bottom of my Foot
A lump on the bottom of your foot is usually a fibroma. This is a thickening of connective tissue at the bottom of your foot.

 

2) Plantar Fasciitis:

  • Which is the most common source of arch & heel pain in the world.
  • Inflammation can cause your arch ligaments to swell.
  • This leads to stiff & aching morning pain.
  • This is not a very hard lump, but a big swollen hard area.
  • This is much more common, but less of a hard lump than a plantar fibroma.
Lump on the bottom of the foot
This is painful morning swelling. It is the thickening of the ligament at the bottom of your foot due to inflammation.

 

3) Foot Bump Cancer:

  • This is very, very rare.
  • If you have a hard discrete bump, it is likely a fibroma or plantar fasciitis.
  • But even if it is very rare, MRI or X-ray should be done to rule out this very dangerous tumor.
foot bump cancer
Even though a foot bump due to cancer at the bottom of the foot is rare, it should be ruled out.

4)Ganglionic Cyst:

  • Ganglion cysts are swellings of fluid.
  • They are usually near foot joints.
  • The most common are the big toe joint, the middle of the foot and the ankle.
  • A cyst by definition is a sac filled with fluid and it can feel hard or soft.
  • These are usually not dangerous.

soft foot bump

 

 

 

Plantar Fibroma Guide:

If you can feel a “pebble- like mass” it is most likely a plantar fibroma:

Hard Bump on the Bottom of my Foot
If the lump on the bottom of the foot is hard, consider a plantar fibroma as the number one cause.
  • It is a relatively non-dangerous condition that occurs at the bottom of your feet.
  • They are most common y in the arch.
  • A plantar fibroma is the development of what feels like a pebble of connective tissue.
  • They can be small or large.
  • It can be one or multiple.

 

Bottom of foot bump
A fibroma can occur anywhere in the body, but it is most annoying as a hard bump on the bottom of the foot. Although this may be worse cosmetically!

Where Did It Come From?

  •  The nodules are extremely slow growing taking months to years before they even begin to irritate you.
  • They can occur due to trauma.
  • They can occur due to abnormal stress.
  • Sometimes they can be genetic.
  • They are still not completely understood, but it is the abnormal function of collagen producing cells.
  • They are signaled by your immune system to start working.

 

Bump on bottom of foot
Collagen is a hard protein that makes connective tissue. The abnormal growth can produce a fibroma.

 

 

Symptoms of a Hard Bump on the Bottom of My Foot:

  • Plantar Fibromas are not tender and painful by themselves.
  • But it feels like there is a pebble trapped under your skin.
  • This causes pain with every step that you take.
  • This condition occurs on both sides of the feet in approximately 25% of people.
  • Hard painful bump.
  • “Under the skin”.

 

 

Plantar Fibroma Treatment:

A plantar fibroma can be treated conservatively or surgically.

 

bump on the bottom of the foot
An accomodative orthotic with a cutout for the fibroma can create pain free walking & running!

Conservative bump on the bottom of the foot treatment:

  • Gel cushioning.
  • Accomodative orthotics.
  • Shoe accomodations.
  • Get cutous.
  • Pads.

Surgical bump on the bottom of the foot treatment:

  • If the mass is extremely large, surgery is likely your only option.
  • You should schedule a visit with an experienced foot doctor or podiatrist immediately for an evaluation.
  • Nothing else will work to remove the mass.