Foot Corn Removal Surgery

Foot Corn Removal Surgery


Foot Corn Removal Surgery is designed to wipe out highly resistant foot corns after conservative treatment has failed. Foot corns are painful formations of thick skin on the foot and toes that look like a hard pebble. Many people can even form a corn within a callus, this is a hard pebble surrounded by a softer callus over top of it. There are many reasons and theories for why corns with calluses occur, but it there is no point really getting into it because the treatments are all the same!

Foot Corn Removal Surgery

Foot Corn Removal Surgery

 

Pain occurs from the corns and calluses because as you walk on them, they tear away from the skin underneath them and it is possible to form a callus blister and even an ulceration underneath them. The goal of treatment is to reduce both corns and calluses as well as keep them soft and eventually remove the deformity or biomechanical problem that is causing them. Foot Corn Surgery is rarely needed, but usually foot corn is extremely effective and prevents the corns from ever coming back.

 

Corn on the toes
Corn on the Toes

 

Foot Corn (aka Heloma) vs Callus

  • Corns are a form within the skin underneath the pressure areas of the foot, especially the toes. Skin callus formation can be large and spread out, whereas a corn is more pinpoint, small and hard.
  • Corns usually occur under the first toe, the fifth toe and ontop of the toes if you have hammertoes, whereas a callus is usually underneath the forefoot.
  • Both can occur together- it is necessary to take the callus down then pop out the corn

Corn vs. Wart

  • Skin lines go through a callus, whereas if you have a wart, the skin lines go around the wart. The plantar wart also displays little red “dots” that are blood vessel growth into the wart. The callus should not have any red “dots”.
  • A corn will be lodged beneath the outer layers of the callus.

 

What Causes Them?

  • Walking barefoot or in poorly stitched.
  • Wearing loose shoes or sandals.
  • High heels that can cause pressure or friction.
  • High arched feet form calluses under the first toe, fifth toe and under the heel.
  • Flat foot is the primary cause of increased pressure in areas of the foot, especially everywhere in the forefoot and inside of the foot and heel.
  • Rubbing in of the tops of the toes against a tight shoe is also a leading cause of corn formation in the toes.

Home Prevention

  • Get your foot size measured properly- check the width, the length and the arch length. It is especially important to have a wide toe box and an extra half size in the front of your shoe for your toes to wiggle. Avoid shoe gear pressing the fourth and fifth toes together
  • You can use Jill’s foot pads between your toes and around the calluses to prevent them from shearing against the shoe.
  • Foam or moleskin pads that are cut-out around the callus and corn in a circle shape, preventing shearing force against the corn.
  • Change from cotton socks! Synthetic socks like those made from polyester are great for summer because they do not absorb sweat like cotton socks, this prevents skin friction and callus/corn formation. Synthetic wool socks are really good for the winter because they keep you warm and prevent absorbing sweat as well.
  • You can put vaseline or petroleum oil in the areas where friction is most likely to occur or if you already have callus formation. Combine this method with the socks and the callus pain should be dramatically decreased.
  • The calluses and corns need to be thinned down through the methods mentioned in the next section in order to prevent pain.

 

Treatment of Skin Calluses with Salicylic Acid

  • It is a “keratolytic” that kills the callus and turns it into a peeling dead skin that is more easily removed by debriding agents like a emergy board or a pumice stone.
  • **Be careful if you have frail skin, this may result in penetration of the skin. It is important that you use an antibiotic ointment and go see a doctor immediately.

 

Home Treatment

  • Soak your feet! It is very easy to soak your feet and then grind away the skin with a pumice stone or an emery board. Soak your feet for at least fifteen to thirty minutes. It is possible to add Epsom Salts to improve the results.
  • The above point can be supplemented by applying salicylic acid to your skin callus after soaking. Try salicylic acid at night for a few nights to see if it decreases callus formation. Most commercial products rely on salicylic acid and the process is detailed above.
  • Aloe Vera, Cocoa Butter or Lotions + Socks is also very good for calluses. Apply the agent of choice to the calluses when you go to bed at night and over a few days the calluses should start to decrease and the socks should keep your sheets clean.
  • Use an emery board or a pumice stone can then be used to remove the callus for faster results.
  • Antibiotic medication incase you cause bleeding or tear the skin.
  • Use gel pads for calluses between the toes. A bandaid can work but there are fantastic products such as gel pads that will make your pain disappear and you won’t even know that they are there. Jill’s foot pads are available at most pharmacies and are very cheap.
  • Change from cotton socks! Synthetic socks like those made from polyester are great for summer because they do not absorb sweat like cotton socks, this prevents skin friction and callus/corn formation. Synthetic wool socks are really good for the winter because they keep you warm and prevent absorbing sweat as well.
  • You can put vaseline or petroleum oil in the areas where friction is most likely to occur or if you already have callus formation. Combine this method with the socks and the callus pain should be dramatically decreased.
  • Note: These can all be temporary methods if the callus is still tender, seeing a podiatrist to correct the deformity through bio-mechanical evaluation and Xray to see if there is something underneath the callus or corn.

When to see a podiatrist for Foot Corn Removal Surgery.

  • Get a biomechanical exam to determine why the corn continues to appear.
  • If the corn & callus is removed and the pain is still there for a long time means that you likely have a deformity in that area and it may need to be surgically corrected.
  • All of the above methods are only temporary treatments. Skin calluses are usually due to a deformity that would need to be corrected.
  • Surgery is usually not necessary, unless there is bone deformity such as a hammer toe or a bunion. The calluses and corns will usually keep re-appearing if this problem is not corrected.

For more on Foot Corn Removal Surgery:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_(medicine)